UNRWA’s closure plan in Jerusalem .. How do refugees hurt?

The girl woke up early in the morning, got up from her bed to wear her planned school uniform in white and green, and wrapped her hair in a ponytail on her back and went to her UNRWA school in the Bab al-Magharba neighborhood of Silwan, south of the Al-Aqsa Mosque.

organized with her colleagues in the morning queue and then proceeded to reveal her fears of the recent decision of the Israeli mayor Nir Barakat to close all UNRWA schools in Jerusalem at the end of the current academic year.


UNRWA’s closure plan in Jerusalem .. How do refugees hurt?

She looked coherent when she knew about herself and said she was currently studying in seventh grade and joined this school in the first grade. But the hushja soon appeared in her voice when she talked about her feelings about the school. “Here is my home and my second family, It is our right to learn in the place we have chosen. ”

“I have learned to read and write and do not belong anywhere else,” Nur said. “The option to attend a municipal school was available, but my parents, as well as my school enrollment, are affiliated with the agency, and I will try to stay there. “sHe said.

UNRWA schools




The three students, together with 50 other students in this school, are studying from the first to the ninth grades and are now threatened with closure, as well as six UNRWA schools in the occupied city, with some 1,800 students studying.

According to the statement issued by the municipality of the occupation, Barakat plans to build municipal schools to accommodate these students, especially those who are educated in UNRWA schools in the Shuafat refugee camp, claiming that it is the only camp in the West Bank that is within the municipal jurisdiction.

There are three UNRWA schools in the camp, two for females and one for males, with a total of 850 students.

We left the Maghrabi neighborhood school in Silwan and went to the UNRWA clinic near Bab al-Sahera in the Old City of Jerusalem. The mayor’s plan is aimed at all the agency’s institutions in the city, and aims to liquidate it and stop its work.

We met with Halima Za’atara (70 years old) with the identity of the West Bank. She was forced to cross military checkpoints to receive free treatment at the Agency’s clinic.

“If I shut down this medical facility, thousands of Palestinians will depend on it for disaster,” Halima said. “I brought my children from a very young age to treatment here and receive vaccinations.

 

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