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Daily life of #Palestinians under #Israel #Occupation, it is miserable and humiliation lacking basic life needs.

Let’s make one thing clear. Israel has a right to exist and to defend itself. That is an indisputable fact. But so do Palestinians, and that’s a fact that’s often ignored. Palestinians are at best third-class citizens in the nation of their birth. The idea that it is even remotely controversial to call what Israel has imposed on Palestinians a form of apartheid is laughable.

One look at a current map of Israel, Gaza, and the occupied territories conjures up only one other example, apartheid-era South Africa. The Israeli government on an ongoing basis declares parcels of land on which Palestinians live to be either archeology important. Sometimes there’s a court case and almost always Palestinians lose.

Months or weeks later that important land becomes home to a brand-new Israeli settlement. As more and more Jewish settlers take over land on which Arabs live, the occupied west bank because de facto more Israeli and more Jewish. This is a long-standing attempt and deliberate attempt to force Arabs that have lived in that land, sometimes for hundreds of years, out.

It is an attempt to dilute their presence because to have Arabs as full participants are in the opinion of the Israeli government and their courts diluting Israel. Prior to the pandemic, I toured many of the contested areas and homes from which Arabs are being pushed you had out, both in Israel proper and in occupied territories.

Palestinians don’t control the important parts of their lives. Palestinian families are refused permits to build or renovate their homes when they connect their homes to the municipal water supply, Israeli soldiers sometimes cut the pipes. When they attempt to harness solar energies because their homes are not on the grid, Israeli soldiers come and remove solar panels from their homes.

I spent an hour and a half traveling alongside an elderly Palestinian woman being transferred between three ambulances from Gaza to the no-man’s land in between and then into Israel to get cancer treatment. Three ambulances over the course of one mile. More than an hour to cross the border.

That’s how Gazans live, without medical treatment because Israel prevents it, without electricity much of the time because Israel prevents it, without the ability to fish in the Mediterranean ocean buss Israel prevents it, without an airport or seaport because Israel prevents it. Like Israelis, Palestinians have a right to exist and to defend themselves, but there is no one willing to help them do that.

Not the Israeli courts and not the u.s. government. What the u.s. also shares with Israel is the belief that Hamas, the political party that governs Gaza, is a terrorist organization that calls for the destruction of Israel. Hamas is supported by the majority of Palestinians in Gaza. Hamas may not be in the best long-term interests of the Gazans but peace hasn’t really worked out for them.

Faced with an Israeli government that pins them into what has been called the world’s largest open-air prison, they have chosen a government most of us wouldn’t prefer, one not given to negotiation and moderation and respect for its neighbor. Israel needs a new approach to the Palestinians and America needs a new approach to Israel.

After more than seven decades of not just being deprived of land which they were evicted, Palestinian frustration runs deep. It may be worth going deeper than what you may hear inside your bubble and understanding the depth to which the Palestinian people are subject to apartheid in their own land, deprived of basic necessities, and subject to relentless civil rights violations.

This is not a secret.

 

Source Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDIVtKKsPs0

Eleven children receiving NRC trauma care killed in their homes by Israeli air strikes
The Norwegian Refugee Council confirmed today that 11 of over 60 children killed by Israeli air strikes in Gaza over the last week were participating in its psycho-social programme aimed at helping them deal with trauma.
All of the children between 5 and 15 years old were killed in their homes in densely populated areas along with countless other relatives who died or received injuries.

“We are devastated to learn that 11 children we were helping with trauma were bombarded while they were at home and thought they were safe,” said NRC’s Secretary General Jan Egeland. ” They are now gone, killed with their families, buried with their dreams and the nightmares that haunted them. We call on Israel to stop this madness: children must be protected. Their homes must not be targets. Schools must not be targets. Spare these children and their families. Stop bombing them now.”

The children NRC assisted included Lina Iyad Sharir, 15, who was killed with both of her parents in their home on 11 May in Gaza City’s Al Manara neighbourhood. Her two-year-old sister Mina sustained third-degree burns and remains in critical condition.

Hala Hussein al-Rifi, 13, was killed on the night of 12 May when an airstrike hit the Salha residential building in Gaza City’s Tal Al-Hawa neighbourhood. The attack also killed four-year-old Zaid Mohammad Telbani and his mother Rima, who was five months pregnant. Zaid’s sister remains missing and is presumed dead.

Multiple air raids on 16 May in Al Wahda Street in central Gaza City killed eight children that NRC worked with, together with several family members. These included Tala Ayman Abu al-Auf, 13, and her 17-year-old brother. Their father, Dr Ayman Abu al-Auf, was the head of internal medicine at Gaza City’s Shifa hospital. He was also killed.

The same attacks also killed Rula Mohammad al-Kawlak, 5, Yara, 9, and Hala, 12 – all sisters – together with their cousin Hana, 14, and several other of their relatives, as well as sisters Dima and Mira Rami al-Ifranji, 15 and 11, and neighbour Dana Riad Hasan Ishkantna, 9.

In the same area on 17 May, Rafeef Murshed Abu Dayer, 10, another student helped by NRC, was killed after shrapnel hit her together with her two brothers, who were having lunch in the garden of the Ghazi Shawa building. Rafeef’s 11th birthday would have been next week on 25 May.

NRC assists 118 schools in the Gaza Strip, reaching more than 75,000 students through its psycho-social intervention, the Better Learning Programme.

“As an urgent measure, we appeal to all parties for an immediate ceasefire so that we can reach those in need and spare more civilians,” Egeland said. “But the truth is that there can be no peace or security as long as there are systemic injustices. The siege of Gaza needs to be lifted and the occupation of Palestinians must end if we are to avoid more trauma and death among children and new cycles of destruction every few years.”

The New Women of Gaza

The inspiring story of five women striving to make a difference in Gaza under siege.

As the crippling blockade of Gaza by Israel and Egypt continues, poverty levels continue to rise in the territory, a narrow strip of land along the eastern Mediterranean coast.

Gaza is home to more than 1.5 million Palestinians, half of them under the age of 15. Unemployment stands at 52 percent, according to the World Bank. Gazans face poor water and sanitation conditions and overstretched hospitals, among other adversities, according to the Palestinian Center for Human Rights.




This film follows five strong-willed women who are doing their utmost to make a difference in Gaza in different walks of life – medicine, social work, photojournalism, music and local government. Despite the socio-economic conditions in Gaza, the five of them work to make life better for their families and communities.

Filmmaker Mariam Shahin tells Al Jazeera: “Nour, Mona, Itimad, Haifa and Heba represent a new generation of Palestinian women in the Gaza Strip who have freed themselves psychologically of restrictions that society placed on them.”

She says that they defy stereotypes of women in the Arab world and have carried out a “quiet revolution” by using their work and activities to follow their chosen paths.

“They have also chosen to carry men with them rather than stand against them, in an effort to reform their society without causing major upheaval,” Shahin adds.




Nour Halaby is a photographer who has documented the experiences of many Palestinians, including some of the women in this film. Itimad Al Tarshawi is a local politician used to work in the Ministry of Social Affairs but has now moved to the Ministry of Labour. Haifa Farajallah is a singer trying to make her way in the creative sector as well as being a young divorcee. Dr Mona Kiskin is a neurosurgeon at Al Shifa Hospital who is also a mother of three. Heba Mahmoud Abu Shalouf was badly injured in an Israeli attack but married, has two children and trained to be a trauma therapist.

“Seven years ago, people looked down on injured and disabled people. People said that girls with injuries should just stay at home and do nothing. Now things have changed. Every home has someone injured or disabled. Children with disabilities weren’t allowed into regular schools. They were kept at home. This has now changed. Schools, organisations, and universities now admit disabled people,” Shalouf tells.



Four years after the original filming of The New Women of Gaza, filmmaker Mariam Shahin returned to see how these five women in Gaza were coping with the continued blockade. This film reflects the changes in their lives since and the work they have done to improve the lives of others in Gaza.

“It is great to be able to enter the world of others with the camera and document their lives. It is even greater to be able to capture the changes that take place after the initial film is finished,” Shahin explains.

“Returning to the women we documented in 2015 gave them a sense of comfort and the knowledge that we did not ‘steal’ their stories but continue to be interested in allowing their voices to be heard and their continued struggles not to be forgotten.”

Source: Al Jazeera

 

Martyr and 30 wounded on the Gaza Strip border on Friday

Gaza city, (Gaza News)  A Palestinian civilian was killed and 30 others were injured during Friday’s march on the 59th anniversary of the march.

The Ministry of Health announced the death of Abdullah Juma ‘Abd al-Aal, 24, from wounds he sustained during marches today east of Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip.




According to our correspondent, thousands of people began to flock to the five return camps east of the Gaza Strip.

Israeli soldiers fired live bullets, rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at peaceful demonstrators. According to the Ministry of Health, 30 citizens were injured, including four children and a paramedic.

The Supreme National Authority for Return and Breaking the Siege has called on the people of the Gaza Strip to participate in the day and raise the banner of “united against the deal”.

She stressed that participation “emphasizes our rejection of all the projects of the Palestinian cause, foremost of which is the deal of the century.”

The Authority confirmed the peaceful march and its popular character, warning the Israeli occupation against committing any folly against peaceful demonstrators.