Daily life of #Palestinians under #Israel #Occupation, it is miserable and humiliation lacking basic life needs.

Let’s make one thing clear. Israel has a right to exist and to defend itself. That is an indisputable fact. But so do Palestinians, and that’s a fact that’s often ignored. Palestinians are at best third-class citizens in the nation of their birth. The idea that it is even remotely controversial to call what Israel has imposed on Palestinians a form of apartheid is laughable.

One look at a current map of Israel, Gaza, and the occupied territories conjures up only one other example, apartheid-era South Africa. The Israeli government on an ongoing basis declares parcels of land on which Palestinians live to be either archeology important. Sometimes there’s a court case and almost always Palestinians lose.

Months or weeks later that important land becomes home to a brand-new Israeli settlement. As more and more Jewish settlers take over land on which Arabs live, the occupied west bank because de facto more Israeli and more Jewish. This is a long-standing attempt and deliberate attempt to force Arabs that have lived in that land, sometimes for hundreds of years, out.

It is an attempt to dilute their presence because to have Arabs as full participants are in the opinion of the Israeli government and their courts diluting Israel. Prior to the pandemic, I toured many of the contested areas and homes from which Arabs are being pushed you had out, both in Israel proper and in occupied territories.

Palestinians don’t control the important parts of their lives. Palestinian families are refused permits to build or renovate their homes when they connect their homes to the municipal water supply, Israeli soldiers sometimes cut the pipes. When they attempt to harness solar energies because their homes are not on the grid, Israeli soldiers come and remove solar panels from their homes.

I spent an hour and a half traveling alongside an elderly Palestinian woman being transferred between three ambulances from Gaza to the no-man’s land in between and then into Israel to get cancer treatment. Three ambulances over the course of one mile. More than an hour to cross the border.

That’s how Gazans live, without medical treatment because Israel prevents it, without electricity much of the time because Israel prevents it, without the ability to fish in the Mediterranean ocean buss Israel prevents it, without an airport or seaport because Israel prevents it. Like Israelis, Palestinians have a right to exist and to defend themselves, but there is no one willing to help them do that.

Not the Israeli courts and not the u.s. government. What the u.s. also shares with Israel is the belief that Hamas, the political party that governs Gaza, is a terrorist organization that calls for the destruction of Israel. Hamas is supported by the majority of Palestinians in Gaza. Hamas may not be in the best long-term interests of the Gazans but peace hasn’t really worked out for them.

Faced with an Israeli government that pins them into what has been called the world’s largest open-air prison, they have chosen a government most of us wouldn’t prefer, one not given to negotiation and moderation and respect for its neighbor. Israel needs a new approach to the Palestinians and America needs a new approach to Israel.

After more than seven decades of not just being deprived of land which they were evicted, Palestinian frustration runs deep. It may be worth going deeper than what you may hear inside your bubble and understanding the depth to which the Palestinian people are subject to apartheid in their own land, deprived of basic necessities, and subject to relentless civil rights violations.

This is not a secret.

 

Source Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDIVtKKsPs0

Eleven children receiving NRC trauma care killed in their homes by Israeli air strikes
The Norwegian Refugee Council confirmed today that 11 of over 60 children killed by Israeli air strikes in Gaza over the last week were participating in its psycho-social programme aimed at helping them deal with trauma.
All of the children between 5 and 15 years old were killed in their homes in densely populated areas along with countless other relatives who died or received injuries.

“We are devastated to learn that 11 children we were helping with trauma were bombarded while they were at home and thought they were safe,” said NRC’s Secretary General Jan Egeland. ” They are now gone, killed with their families, buried with their dreams and the nightmares that haunted them. We call on Israel to stop this madness: children must be protected. Their homes must not be targets. Schools must not be targets. Spare these children and their families. Stop bombing them now.”

The children NRC assisted included Lina Iyad Sharir, 15, who was killed with both of her parents in their home on 11 May in Gaza City’s Al Manara neighbourhood. Her two-year-old sister Mina sustained third-degree burns and remains in critical condition.

Hala Hussein al-Rifi, 13, was killed on the night of 12 May when an airstrike hit the Salha residential building in Gaza City’s Tal Al-Hawa neighbourhood. The attack also killed four-year-old Zaid Mohammad Telbani and his mother Rima, who was five months pregnant. Zaid’s sister remains missing and is presumed dead.

Multiple air raids on 16 May in Al Wahda Street in central Gaza City killed eight children that NRC worked with, together with several family members. These included Tala Ayman Abu al-Auf, 13, and her 17-year-old brother. Their father, Dr Ayman Abu al-Auf, was the head of internal medicine at Gaza City’s Shifa hospital. He was also killed.

The same attacks also killed Rula Mohammad al-Kawlak, 5, Yara, 9, and Hala, 12 – all sisters – together with their cousin Hana, 14, and several other of their relatives, as well as sisters Dima and Mira Rami al-Ifranji, 15 and 11, and neighbour Dana Riad Hasan Ishkantna, 9.

In the same area on 17 May, Rafeef Murshed Abu Dayer, 10, another student helped by NRC, was killed after shrapnel hit her together with her two brothers, who were having lunch in the garden of the Ghazi Shawa building. Rafeef’s 11th birthday would have been next week on 25 May.

NRC assists 118 schools in the Gaza Strip, reaching more than 75,000 students through its psycho-social intervention, the Better Learning Programme.

“As an urgent measure, we appeal to all parties for an immediate ceasefire so that we can reach those in need and spare more civilians,” Egeland said. “But the truth is that there can be no peace or security as long as there are systemic injustices. The siege of Gaza needs to be lifted and the occupation of Palestinians must end if we are to avoid more trauma and death among children and new cycles of destruction every few years.”

Ramadan 2021

What Is Ramadan?
Ramadan Kareem or Ramadan Mubarak — either greeting expresses good wishes at the start of this sacred time. Every year at the sighting of a new moon on the ninth lunar month, the 30 days of Ramadan begin, and with them, a host of Ramadan traditions, including “sawm” — the practice of fasting from sunrise to sunset, which is one of Islam’s five pillars. Why? Ramadan is a sacred time of prayer, charity and contemplation marking the time during which Allah is said to have spoken the first verses of the Quran — or Islam’s holy text — to the Prophet Mohammed on Laylat al-Qadr, or “The Night of Power.” Now, it’s a month when “the gates of Heaven are open and the gates of Hell are closed and the devils are chained.”

To observe this holiness and show dedication to Allah and the word of Islam, Muslims use Ramadan to become more closely in touch with their spirituality, deepen their sense of humility, become closer to God and renew their religious selfhood through a series of spiritual and physical practices that last approximately 30 days and 30 nights — or as long as Ramadan continues on any given year. The most prominent Ramadan tradition is fasting, but the month also entails an increased focus on dedicated prayer as well as charitable efforts and initiatives. Muslims also make efforts to discourage any negative emotions, complaining, gossiping or swearing during Ramadan — all concentration should be on prayer, humility and positivity.

While there are special allowances for children and the elderly as well as Muslims who are pregnant, nursing, traveling or ill, fasting is a practice all Muslims must partake in each Ramadan to fulfill one of their sacred pillars of Islam. There are five pillars total — fasting, charity, prayer, testimony of faith and a pilgrimage to Mecca. The holy practice of sawm serves to reinforce religious values in a variety of ways. Not only does it provide Muslims with a renewed compassion for the poor by showing what daily hunger and thirst feel like, but it also reminds them of their frailty as humble humans and their dependence on Allah for sustenance while removing external distractions to let them focus on their faith.

Fasting isn’t just about abstaining from food. During Ramadan daylight hours, Muslims avoid eating, drinking liquids, taking medication, chewing gum, and engaging in sexual activity of any kind — some even choose to refrain from their favorite pastimes like watching television or listening to music in order to make more time to focus on prayer. Each day during this holy time, Muslim men, women, and children awaken well before dawn and eat a large meal — or “suhoor” — packed with protein and plenty of fluids to carry them through daylight hours until their next meal after dark, then they perform their morning prayer and prepare for the day.

While some businesses or schools in Muslim-majority countries may reduce their operating hours during the month of Ramadan, Muslims continue to go about their regular lives, jobs, and activities while fasting. When the day is over and the evening call to prayer signals the end of the fast, families and friends celebrate with an “iftar” or light meal before performing their evening prayer at home or in the mosque and coming together again for a larger meal later. This routine continues each day as Muslims around the globe observe Ramadan’s meaning.

Ramadan 2021 In Gaza

قد تكون صورة لـ ‏‏‏‏٤‏ أشخاص‏، ‏‏أشخاص يجلسون‏، ‏أشخاص يقفون‏‏‏ و‏منظر داخلي‏‏

While Ramadan is a time of holiness, charity, contemplation and spirituality meant to be spent with family in festivity, goodwill, prayer and celebration, the bombings of Gaza conflict still casts a shadow over many people in Palestine, making it difficult to observe Ramadan traditionally. Conflict, rising food prices, movement restrictions and lack of resources make life a daily struggle for refugees and vulnerable families in Gaza, the West Bank

With a damaged economy and a multitude of industrial sanctions, unemployment in Gaza has reached a rate of 43 percent, and it remains extremely high in the rest of Palestine, affecting agriculture, fishing, construction and other industries people rely on for their livelihoods. Because food is increasingly more expensive and access to nutritious choices is extremely limited, most people need to spend half of their small incomes on food — still, 1.6 million people in Palestine don’t have enough to eat and they have trouble affording other essentials like medicine and education.

With such a shortage in resources, Ramadan becomes very difficult for Muslim families in Palestine — planning nutritious suhoor and iftar meals is a challenge when there isn’t enough food, and large, celebratory family gatherings and feasts to share with the community are almost unthinkable. Economic difficulties also make it impossible for families to exchange gifts or purchase new clothing for Eid Al Fitr, let alone give anything to charity when they are already struggling.

قد تكون صورة لـ ‏‏‏‏‏٢‏ شخصان‏، ‏طفل‏‏، ‏‏أشخاص يقفون‏، ‏أشخاص يجلسون‏‏‏ و‏نشاطات في أماكن مفتوحة‏‏

As a non-profit, non-political, non-religious charitable group dedicated to easing suffering and addressing developmental and humanitarian needs in Gaza, S.O.S Gaza CHILDREN has been helping people in Gaza for3 years. By providing essential resources like food and water and working to give education and other needs in struggling areas, we work to rebuild communities and provide people with the tools they deserve to live dignified, self-sufficient lives in the midst of conflict.

This Ramadan, join us in our effort to rebuild disadvantaged, marginalized communities hindered by political and economic conflict. Your help will fund our efforts to provide personalized community attention to people in need — with Your help, we effect change and rebuild the lives of our neighbors and poor people in Gaza.
Make a donation today to change the life of a family forever

Save the Children warns fresh violence may destroy last vestiges of resilience  

Feelings of depression, hyperactivity, a preference for being alone, and aggression were reported by 95 percent of children in Gaza, new research released by Save the Children has shown.

The combination of these symptoms in unison is consistent with deep psychological distress, with more than 96 percent of their caregivers also saying they recognized all four groups of symptoms in their sons, daughters or grandchildren.

The survey, involving 150 caregivers and 150 children living in Gaza, was conducted before the recent wave of protests in which more than 100 people – including 14 children – were killed in six weeks by Israeli forces.

Findings revealed that children of Gaza were already showing worrying signs of distress including nightmares, which were experienced by 63 percent, as well as difficulties sleeping, reported by 68 percent.



For children, the threat of conflict, the fear of bombs, and the constant insecurity caused by the unstable political situation were the biggest source of stress, with 60 percent of caregivers saying it was taking a toll. Additionally, aircraft sounds were cited as the single biggest source of fear in 78 percent of children.

Boys and girls regularly said that they were “scared” or left feeling “unsafe” by the prospect of war or “bombs being thrown” at them and their families. This led some to fear sleeping at night to “protect them from having bad dreams”.

“I have many horrible nightmares, and a constant feeling of fear that I may be targeted with a bomb or shelled, or injured or killed,” said Samar*, a 15-year-old girl from Gaza who has lived through three wars, remembers nothing but life under blockade and who recently attended the March of Return protests.



“This feeling has gripped me and many other children as well. There are many children who have been psychologically damaged by their fear – they are terrified and this has greatly affected their behavior.” 

Save the Children is deeply concerned that the increasing violence children are experiencing and the growing sense of uncertainty will push their resilience to breaking point.

“When I was at the March and saw people injured I was very upset,” said Samar.“I would cry when I saw innocent children who committed no crime get injured and I cried when I saw dead children. It was heartbreaking and painful. I am still sad – they were just children and I have seen them (injured) – it is a really painful feeling.” 

Despite the huge pressures many children were facing, the research found that most were exhibiting signs of resilience. More than 80 percent said they could speak to family and friends about their problems and 90 percent said they felt supported by their parents.

“Much of children’s security was related to a sense of stability that their families were able to offer, with more than 80 percent of the 150 children interviewed saying they did not feel safe being away from their parents,” said Dr. Marcia Brophy, a Senior Mental Health Advisor for Save the Children in the Middle East.



“However, recent weeks have seen thousands suffer through the injury or death of a father, mother or a relative. Such a loss of family security in an already insecure environment risks pushing children to the brink of a mental health crisis and poses a significant threat to children’s fragile coping mechanisms. This places them athigh risk of toxic stress, the most dangerous form of stress response caused by a strong or prolonged exposure to adversity.” 

Fresh protests are expected to continue until 5thJune, the commemoration of forced displacement that occurred after the 1967 war. More than 1,000 children, and at least 11,000 adults, have already been injured by Israeli forces since the protests began.

“It is too soon to understand the full impact the recent violence has had on children, some of whom have lost a parent or loved one, or had to become carers for those injured in the protests,” said Dr. Brophy. “What we do know is that the break down of family security is one of the key triggers for mental health issues among children in conflict. A whole generation of children in Gaza is balancing on a knife edge where one more shock could have devastating life-long consequences.” 

The last ten years have seen families face a host of difficulties and uncertainties in Gaza. The Israeli blockade, as well as three conflicts, has put enormous strain on the economy and key services.

Almost 90 percent of the 150 caregivers interviewed said that the blockade has had a significant impact on their and their children’s daily lives. Widespread electricity shortages – that have left most families with just a few hours of power every day – were cited as the single biggest negative factor, impacting 60 percent of children.

Children often expressed feeling “angry” when the electricity was cut or said they felt anxious, alone and like “there was no one with them” during the night when the lights were off. Caregivers meanwhile were most concerned by the deteriorating economic situation, with nearly half saying it was their biggest source of stress of fear.

In the last 15 years, the poverty rate has risen from 30 to more than 50 percent while unemployment is up from 35 to 43 percent and now stands at 60 percent among youth. Less than 20 years ago, 96 percent of people had clean drinking water, now 93 percent don’t. Medical and food supplies are also scarce and expensive while permits to leave Gaza for medical treatment are increasingly hard to get.




“Many children in Gaza have known nothing but blockade, war and a growing cycle of deprivation. Their stress and anxiety compounds with every day that they continue to live in uncertainty. And, on top of this, many have been injured or witnessed violence,” said Jennifer Moorehead, Save the Children’s Country Director for the occupied Palestinian territory. 

“They are trying to recover in an extremely challenging situation where there are not enough hospital beds or medicines to treat children properly, where there is no electricity for most of the day and where they are increasingly seeing their parents struggling to make ends meet. 

“The children of Gaza are resilient but they must urgently receive more support to overcome their traumatic experiences. The international community needs to step up its assistance and introduce more mental health and psycho-social support into schools, extra curricular activities and homes.Only by doing this immediate step, as well as focusing on ending the blockade and finding a durable and just solution, will children have a more hopeful future.

Israeli air strikes on the Gaza Strip have killed eight members of the same family, the Ministry of Health announced today.

A Palestinian house was destroyed, killing 8 members of same family, after Israel carried out air strikes in Gaza on 14 November 2019

A Palestinian house was destroyed, killing 8 members of same family, after Israel carried out air strikes in Gaza on 14 November 2019

Witnesses said Israeli occupation fighters targeted the Al-Sawarka family home at 1:15am local time today, destroying it.

The house is located east of the city of Deir Al-Balah, in the middle of the Gaza Strip.

The Ministry of Health named the deceased as: Rasmi Abu Malhous, 45, Mariam Abu Malhous, 35, Yosra Abu Malhous, 39, Waseem Abu Malhous, 13, Mohannad Abu Malhous, 12, and Mu’az Abu Malhous, 7.

The bodies of two children, Salim and Firas Abu Malhous, were removed from the rubble this morning, it added. Twelve other family members were injured in the attack including a 35-day-old baby who was found cradled in her dead brother Mohannad’s arms following the attack.

LIVE BLOG: Gaza in flames as Israel kills senior Islamic Jihad official

This brings to 34 the number of Palestinians killed in the three days of Israeli bombardment of the Strip. The casualties include eight children and three women. Some 111 people were injured, including 46 children and 20 women.



Those killed were:

  1. Asma Mohammad Hassan Abul-Ata, 39
  2. Bahaa Saleem Hassan Abul-Ata, 42
  3. Mohammad Atiyah Maslah Hamouda, 20
  4. Ibrahim Ahmad Abdul Latifa Al-Dhabous, 26
  5. Zaki Adnan Mohammad Ghanameh, 25
  6. Abdallah Oudh Sakib Al-Bolbeesi, 26
  7. Abdul-Salam Ramadan Ahmad Ahmad, 28
  8. Rani Fayez Rajab Abu-Nasr, 35
  9. Jihad Ayman Ahmad Abu-Khatir, 22
  10. Wael Abdul-Aziz Abdullah Abdul-Nabi, 43
  11. Khalid Maudh Saalim Farraj, 38
  12. Ibrahim Ayman Fathi Abdul-Aal, 17
  13. Ismail Ayman Fathi Abdul-Aal, 16
  14. Ahmad Ayman Fathi Abdul-Aal, 23
  15. Rafat Mohammad Salman Ayyad, 54
  16. Islam Rafat Mohammad Ayyad, 24
  17. Ameer Rafat Mohammad Ayyad, 7
  18. Alaa Jaber Abd Shteiwi, 30
  19. Mahmoud Daham Mahmoud Hathat, 19
  20. Suhail Khidr Khalil Qaniteh, 23
  21. Yousef Rizeq Khalild Abu-Komeel, 35
  22. Mu’min Mohammad Salman Qadoum, 26
  23. Mohamed Abdulla Shurrab, 28
  24. Haitham Hafez Al-Bakri, 22
  25. Obada Hassan Al-Kordi, 28
  26. Mohammad Hassan Abu-Mu’amar, 25
  27. Rasmi Abu Malhous, 45
  28. Yosra Abu Malhous, 39
  29. Mariam Abu Malhous, 35
  30. Mohannad Abu Malhous, 12
  31. Mu’az Abu Malhous, 7
  32. Waseem Abu Malhous, 13
  33. Firas Abu Malhous
  34. Salim Abu Malhous



Martyr and 30 wounded on the Gaza Strip border on Friday

Gaza city, (Gaza News)  A Palestinian civilian was killed and 30 others were injured during Friday’s march on the 59th anniversary of the march.

The Ministry of Health announced the death of Abdullah Juma ‘Abd al-Aal, 24, from wounds he sustained during marches today east of Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip.




According to our correspondent, thousands of people began to flock to the five return camps east of the Gaza Strip.

Israeli soldiers fired live bullets, rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at peaceful demonstrators. According to the Ministry of Health, 30 citizens were injured, including four children and a paramedic.

The Supreme National Authority for Return and Breaking the Siege has called on the people of the Gaza Strip to participate in the day and raise the banner of “united against the deal”.

She stressed that participation “emphasizes our rejection of all the projects of the Palestinian cause, foremost of which is the deal of the century.”

The Authority confirmed the peaceful march and its popular character, warning the Israeli occupation against committing any folly against peaceful demonstrators.



 

Israeli warplanes targeted a home in Eastern Gaza killing a pregnant woman and her child.
The Gaza Health Ministry have confirmed the death of, 1 year old, Seba Arar and her pregnant mother Falasteen Arar (37 years old) after Israeli warplanes targeted their home in Eastern Gaza Strip, two sisters were also critically injured in the attack.




In the past 24 hours, Israel has injured upwards of 100 Palestinians and killed 7, in the besieged Gaza Strip.

BELOW ARE THE NAMES OF THOSE MARTYRED:

1. Seba Abu Arar (1 year 2 months old)

2. Falasteen Arar (37 yrs old and pregnant)

3. Raed Abu Tair (19 yrs old)

4. Emad Nasser (22 yrs old)

5. Alaa Al-Boubali (29 yrs old)

6. Ramzi Abdo (31 yrs old)

7. Abdullah Abu Malouh (33 yrs old)




The armed wings of Hamas and Islamic Jihad have responded with the firing of 300 rockets into Israel, no Israelis have been killed.

Israel has used drones, artillery, warships, warplanes, tanks and helicopter strikes against Gaza. The strikes are ongoing and every section of Gaza has been struck, including notably homes and a university, critically injuring scores.

The situation is ongoing.

chorook 22 years old gaza

chorook 22 years old gaza




“At ten, hemophilia began to penetrate my blood, and my immunity began to weaken somewhat. I spent most of my childhood in the hospital isolation rooms. I remember that my mother could not enter those rooms to relieve me, she was waving through the glass with her hands all the time. The same thing happened in my childhood if I were to spend one holiday outside the hospital, and thanks to the daily conversations between me and the doctors and doctors who turned to provide medical care to me I loved medicine, I planted a dream in Bali, to become a neurologist. , But worsened h Which is more, and this reflected on my average, who did not help me to enter medicine, so I joined the specialty of nursing, which is closest to what I was carrying a dream .. ”

chorook 22 years old gaza

 




ربما تحتوي الصورة على: ‏‏شخص واحد‏، و‏‏جلوس‏‏‏

“From the first moment I followed Israel’s repression of unarmed young people on the Gaza border, and fatal injuries with explosive bullets, I committed myself to go to the nearest border post to rescue the wounded there, better than keeping my house locked or feeling bad, feeling that you have something to offer while you abstain. The first ambulance over the past months to more than 400 injured, and the recovery of two injured until I broke the bullet of an Israeli sniper chest and emerged from my back a week ago, my lungs were damaged a lot and almost doctors would be removed if not for the kindness of God I am breathing now by an industrial tube and I do not know for any reason they intended to hit me, And I am That waiting for pain: not only interested to save the lives of others … I am very scared, I have a beautiful old kid and a half years to come back to him and hugged him .



UNRWA’s closure plan in Jerusalem .. How do refugees hurt?

The girl woke up early in the morning, got up from her bed to wear her planned school uniform in white and green, and wrapped her hair in a ponytail on her back and went to her UNRWA school in the Bab al-Magharba neighborhood of Silwan, south of the Al-Aqsa Mosque.

organized with her colleagues in the morning queue and then proceeded to reveal her fears of the recent decision of the Israeli mayor Nir Barakat to close all UNRWA schools in Jerusalem at the end of the current academic year.


UNRWA’s closure plan in Jerusalem .. How do refugees hurt?

She looked coherent when she knew about herself and said she was currently studying in seventh grade and joined this school in the first grade. But the hushja soon appeared in her voice when she talked about her feelings about the school. “Here is my home and my second family, It is our right to learn in the place we have chosen. ”

“I have learned to read and write and do not belong anywhere else,” Nur said. “The option to attend a municipal school was available, but my parents, as well as my school enrollment, are affiliated with the agency, and I will try to stay there. “sHe said.

UNRWA schools




The three students, together with 50 other students in this school, are studying from the first to the ninth grades and are now threatened with closure, as well as six UNRWA schools in the occupied city, with some 1,800 students studying.

According to the statement issued by the municipality of the occupation, Barakat plans to build municipal schools to accommodate these students, especially those who are educated in UNRWA schools in the Shuafat refugee camp, claiming that it is the only camp in the West Bank that is within the municipal jurisdiction.

There are three UNRWA schools in the camp, two for females and one for males, with a total of 850 students.

We left the Maghrabi neighborhood school in Silwan and went to the UNRWA clinic near Bab al-Sahera in the Old City of Jerusalem. The mayor’s plan is aimed at all the agency’s institutions in the city, and aims to liquidate it and stop its work.

We met with Halima Za’atara (70 years old) with the identity of the West Bank. She was forced to cross military checkpoints to receive free treatment at the Agency’s clinic.

“If I shut down this medical facility, thousands of Palestinians will depend on it for disaster,” Halima said. “I brought my children from a very young age to treatment here and receive vaccinations.

 

Israel to close UNRWA schools in Jerusalem to end refugee ‘lie’

Israel to close UNRWA schools in Jerusalem to end refugee ‘lie’

Israeli Mayor of Jerusalem, Nir Barkat, yesterday announced that he plans to remove the United Nations’ agency for Palestinian refugees from occupied East Jerusalem, accusing it of “operating illegally and promoting incitement against Israel”.

Following the announcement, the Jerusalem Municipality confirmed that UN schools, which serve about 1,800 students, would be closed by the end of the current school year.

The municipality did not provide a specific time schedule for the closures.

Barkat said in a statement that schools, clinics, and sports centres, among other services operated by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) in East Jerusalem, will be transferred to the Israeli occupation authorities.



He claimed that bodies were “illegal” and “operate without an Israeli licence”.

The decision, he added, was triggered by the US’ announcement that it had ended all funding to the UN body.

He said that “The US decision has created a rare opportunity to replace UNRWA’s services with services of the Jerusalem Municipality. We are putting an end to the lie of the ‘Palestinian refugee problem’ and the attempts at creating a false sovereignty within a sovereignty.”

Barkat added that the decision was in coordination with the Israeli government.